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                                THE ACCESS CODE
                                          by
                                  PATTY CARLSON


Continuing my research and development of the Numeric Language of Music program, I have utilized the piano keyboard to test defined patterns of structural form and motion combined with specific numeric sequences. Clients presented with the information have included grammar school children, high school students, college students, special needs children, children with adhd, older clients with late stage dementia, advanced Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, multiple system atrophy, and dyscalculia. Changes in cognitive acceleration, behavioral issues, and reversal of symptoms have been evident in each case.

One client entered the program from the high school’s response to intervention program. She was failing math, not participating in class, and avoided social interaction. Five weeks after starting the program, she had 100% on her math test and joined the basketball team. After graduation she continued on to pursue a career in modeling.

A nine year old girl who entered the program was having behavioral issues. Her grandmother said she had attention issues in school, would not cooperate at home, back talked her a lot and had trouble reading. Also, the girl was not physically affectionate. At most, she would lightly bump her grandmother with her elbow as a show of affection. Having never played the keyboard prior to the program, the girl advanced quickly. She began playing the patterns through complex numeric sequences with little assistance. After the fourth session she ran across the room and threw herself into my arms. She wrapped her arms around my neck, legs around my waist, and hugged me with full body contact. During the fifth session, I was
astonished when, as she was playing complex patterns of structural form and motion through complicated numeric sequences, she simultaneously began to tell me each ingredient and the amount of each ingredient she had used to make her grandmother an apple pie.

A middle aged woman who had been diagnosed with multiple system atrophy told me that, basically, her whole brain was shrinking. She was told the degenerative process was progressing rapidly. When I asked if she wanted to join the program, she was adamant she did not want to take piano lessons. She hated the piano and did not want to learn how to play the instrument. I asked her if she wanted the good news about the program first or the bad news first. She said the good news. I told her I had great hope the new program may reverse her symptoms. Based on the results I was
seeing with other residents whom she knew, I felt it was possible. She asked me what the bad news was. I told her the bad news was she was probably going to learn how to play the piano. After six weeks in the program, there were no visible signs of change in her physical symptoms. She was confined to a wheelchair. Each time she attempted to move, her whole body began to shake. Unfortunately, she chose to leave the program early. Later, I was told by the staff that when she went for further testing, the doctor informed her it appeared the progressive deterioration of her brain had slowed, or stopped. The new tests showed no changes had occurred since her last tests.

Previously in my writings, I suggested, as an analogy, to think of the brain as the hardware, the mind as the software, and the Numeric Language of Music program as the native programming language.

Continuing my research using the piano keyboard to introduce specific mathematical sequences of structural form and motion, I am more persuaded the analogy between the study of computer science and the study of the relationship between the Numeric Language of Music program and the human brain is compelling. I am modifying my hypothesis by suggesting the human skull is similar to the outer casing of a computer, the brain is similar to the inner circuitry of a computer, and the Numeric Language of Music represents algorithmic lines of code, functioning in a similar way to
computer code, to which the inner circuitry responds.

Patty Carlson, author
The Numeric Language of Music®

“The Access Code” by Patty Carlson
©Patty Carlson, March 5, 2017 All rights reserved.

The method of conveying musical information used in the Numeric Language of Music program is protected by US Patent.


PREVIOUS POSTS:

THE NUMERIC LANGUAGE OF MUSIC
A MEANS OF COMMUNICATION
WITH THE HIGHER BRAIN FUNCTIONS

As the author of the Numeric Language of Music, I created a music training program defining music as a mathematical language of structural form and motion (US Patent protected). During the development case studies of students enrolled in the program, consistent acceleration in areas including but not limited to math, reading and science were reported. Students from various cultural and economic backgrounds participated in the program with similar results. Many students increased their math from low D’s to 98%. Reading scores increased from a 1st grade level to a 5th grade 3rd month level. Reading and science scores increased from D’s and failing to A’s and B’s when tested with special needs children. One student who began the instruction when struggling with math tested at an advanced level on the TCAP scores the first year. The following school year the student skipped a full year of math.

The myriad of personal testimonies presented on the Piano Logic website have something in common in addition to accelerated mental performance. The students had not received additional training in the specific subjects. The students did not know how they were able to answer the questions correctly.

After contemplating this recurring observation for some time, I am presenting the hypothesis the Numeric Language of Music is the innate, inherent language of the brain. As the vocabulary of the native language of the brain is introduced in it’s core structural form, a dialogue begins with the higher brain. The response to this communication is evidenced when the higher brain functions bypass the limitations of the conscious mind exhibiting accelerated mental and remedial performance capacity.

Engaging the Numeric Language of Music as a means to communicate with the higher functionality of the brain exponentially increases the future of human potential. Just as in any language, continued study of the vocabulary of the Numeric Language of Music will develop greater comprehensive communication potential with higher brain function.

Respectfully submitted,
Patty Carlson


PREVIOUS POSTS:

My profession as a film score composer includes over 12 years of expertise in composing and producing the style or form of music required for each film.  Music I compose for films has a specific purpose.  That purpose is to enhance and increase the emotional response of the audience to the content of the film. My ability to compose music with specific emotional content relies upon the depth of my comprehension of the language of music.

Understanding music as a language, I studied music compositions breaking down the structural form of the language into simplistic blocks of information.  I introduced the structural form of music vocabulary to my students. 

Observing extraordinary unprecedented acceleration in student performance and composition development, I chose to step aside from my professional performance and film score career to dedicate my life to the research and analysis of what I realized as the Numeric Language of Music.  In 2008, I applied for and was granted a US Patent for a new method of conveying musical information.

Through a Development Case Study program, students were introduced to the study of the Numeric Language of Music as the foundation from which they learned to play the piano.  Rapid acceleration in student cognitive development in additional areas of academics, including math, reading, science and chemistry was reported.  Additional areas indicating remedial changes were also documented.     

In 2010, I was invited to submit a paper to Johns Hopkins University of Education for publishing in the New Horizons for Learning Journal. On September 27th, 2010, I submitted an exploratory thesis titled "Music the Remedial Language of the Brain".  After several months of review, my submission was rejected.  I subsequently published my thesis on the Piano Logic website.

I continued to look for other institutions which were working in the research of music and the brain.  I reached out to many professionals including McGill University, Dr.Zatorre, Dr. Levitin; Dr. Elman, UCSD;  Aniruddh Patel at the Neurosciences Institute, and Dr. Oliver Sacks among others.  I conveyed the discovery of the Numeric Language of Music, the documented exceptional changes in students accelerated academic performance, in addition to other areas of cognitive changes observed from the study of the new system of conveying musical information.  I included my theory the Numeric Language of Music may be the inherent, innate and remedial language of the brain.

Continuing my research in the studies of music and the brain, I realized the Numeric Language of Music had the potential to affect early dementia and Alzheimer's patients. 

In January, 2012, I contacted a prominent gentleman professionally associated with the field of music and health research.  I  discussed my theory of the possibility the new music program might offer a cure for dementia and Alzheimer's patients. He replied that, if I was right, it would be "revolutionary".  I posted my theory on the Piano Logic website suggesting the New Music Education Course should be introduced to music therapy with specific application to patients with early Dementia and Alzheimer's.

"Documented results from the study of Patty Carlson's Music Education Primer Course present compelling evidence to introduce the program intomusic therapy programs and medical research.  Special emphasis of the study of the effect of the Numeric Language of Music with patients suffering with Dementia, early Alzheimer's, and other brain malfunction disorders suggested."

On May 28, 2012, Elizabeth Landau of CNN published an article titled "Music: It's in your head, changing your brain".  The story refers to a Symposium on the Connection between Music and the Brain at the Association for Psychological Science in Chicago. 

In the article, Dr. Levitin is quoted "The structures that respond to music in the brain evolved earlier than the structures that respond to language," Levitin said.

Dr. Patel is quoted, "Another exciting arena of research: Music with a beat seems to helppeople with motor disorders such as Parkinson's disease walk better than in the absence of music -- patients actually synchronize their movements to a beat" Patel said. "That's a very powerful circuit in the brain," he said. "It can actually help people that have these serious neurological diseases."

The article continues:
There's also some evidence to suggest that music can help Alzheimer's patients remember things better and that learning new skills such as musical instruments might even stave off dementia. There still needs to be more research in these areas to confirm, but Limb [Johns Hopkins] is hopeful about the prospect of musical engagement as a way to prevent, or at least delay, dementia. "That's a pretty amazing thing that, from sound, you can stimulate the entire brain,"Limb said. "If you think about dementia as the opposite trend, of the brain atrophying, I think there's a lot of basis to it."

I am an expert in the language of music, first in composition which is the litmus for authentic comprehension of the subject, and in the research and development of the Numeric Language of Music, having defined the language as a Mathematical Science of Structural Form and Motion. 

The results of the study of conventional music education curriculum imply there is a relationship between the study of music and the potential for accelerated performance in additional academic areas.  The limited effect of the system to increase student performance in additional academic subjects correlates with music education programs currently being eliminated in public schools across the country.  News reports students in the U.S. struggling with the basics of math, reading and science. 

The Numeric Language of Music Course presents the student with the study of mathematical algorithms using the piano keyboard. Rapid acceleration in student reading scores, math scores, science scores directly related to learning the Numeric Language of Music presents compelling reasons to implement the program in all research programs of the study of the relationship between music and the brain.

As the author of the Numeric Language of Music, and a research analyst of the relationship between the Numeric Language of Music and the brain, I firmly believe it is possible to effectively treat patients with Dementia, Alzheimer's, or other neurological disorders by implementing the Numeric Language of Music as a music therapy program.

The Numeric Language of Music is the discovery which, upon introduction to research clinics for medical patients,  presents the greatest opportunity for success. 


Patty Carlson
Author: The Numeric Language of Music
US Patent Protected
To obtain licensing agreements for the use of
Numeric Language of Music Program in research, please contact the Piano Logic Office: (800)429-3488
info@pianologic.com              

Subject:  Patty Carlson/The Numeric Language of Music
From:  
pcarlson@pianologic.comDate:  Mon, November 29, 2010 10:00 pm
To:  
robert.zatorre@mcgill.ca

Dear Dr. Zatorre,
I recently learned of Brams Laboratory and your work in cognitive
neuroscience.
My name is Patty Carlson. I am the author of the Numeric Language of
Music, a system of conveying music as a Mathematical Science of Structural
Form and Motion.
During the development case study program of the Numeric Language of
Music, students were able to immediately compose music. Individual
students of multiple ages returned to my studio demonstrating original
compositions using advanced and complex music vocabulary which had not
been introduced in the initial sessions. The degree of musical
composition ability was so far beyond plausible that it warranted
further investigation.
In a comparative research analysis between conventional music education
curriculum and the Numeric Language of Music, I realized that I had
altered the functional role of the alphabetic and numeric symbols in the
very core of the system permeating the entire curriculum. I applied for
an was granted a US Patent for a new method of conveying musical
information.
I have published an exploratory thesis paper titled "Music the Remedial
Language of the Brain" which follows the back ground, development phase,
the student case study results concluding with connecting my work with
Oliver Sacks theory, Jeff Elman's work suggesting the brain is the
language "organ" of the human species, and Dr. Claudius Conrad's work as
a NY surgeon.
It is my hypothesis that the Numeric Language of Music may be the
innate, inherent language of the brain. Further, I believe the Numeric
Language of music, as the native language of the brain, introduces the
brain to the vocabulary of the language of music as a mathematical
science of structural form and motion with which the brain has the
capacity to compose the music it needs to heal itself.
My paper may be viewed as the following link:
http://www.pianologic.com/41201.html
I would like to discuss my work with you at your convenience. I
sincerely look forward to your reply.
Kindest regards,
Patty Carlson
PianoLogic.com


Subject:  Patty Carlson/The Numeric Language of Music
From:  
pcarlson@pianologic.comDate:  Mon, November 29, 2010 6:49 pm
To:  
daniel.levitin@mcgill.ca

Dear Dr. Levitin,
I recently came across your World Science forum "Music on Your Brain".
Your argument that music is at the heart of human nature was very
interesting to me. I am the author of The Numeric Language of Music. By
altering the functional role of the alphabetic and numeric symbols in
music instruction presented to students, unprecedented results occurred.
Students of multiple age groups began to immediately compose music
using advanced and complex vocabulary which had not been introduced in
the preliminary instruction.
Dr. Jeff Elman suggested the brain may be the language "organ" of the
human species in a Gray Matters lecture from UCSD. Your theory that
music paved the way for more complex behaviors like language to evolve
relate to my research indicating the Numeric Language of Music may be
the innate, inherent language of the brain.
"Music the Remedial Language of the Brain" is an exploratory thesis
paper published at http://www.pianologic.com which presents the back
ground and development of my work, examples of the unprecedented
results in immediate composition ability, and evidence of the potential
of the brain's ability to compose music it needs to heal itself.
I would be most interested in the opportunity to explore these concepts
with you.
I sincerely look forward to your reply.
Kindest regards,
Patty Carlson
PianoLogic.com

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